Tips: Collection Triage

If you either:

  • are in a hurry and don’t have the full 30 minutes to collect, or
  • there is a heap of rubbish, beyond what you could collect in 30 mins, or
  •  you don’t have a bag or container to collate your rubbish, so you can only collect what you can hold in two hands

You can still productively collect waste and reduce risk to wildlife. You just need to practice some collection triage.

Prioritise collecting items that will do the most damage to wildlife or which have the potential to do the most harm.

Two Hands Project at Melbourne's Docklands

Two Hands Project at Melbourne's Docklands

Quickie two hands project rationale:

In a quickie or limited Two Hands clean up scenario, we’d suggest you focus on collecting waste that will do the most damage as the priority with anything else you gather being in the nice to have basket.

Things to prioritise:

We’d suggest the following types of items pose the most threat.

  • plastic bags and plastic packaging (e.g. carry bags, bait bags, chip packets, chocolate wrappers)
  • small hard plastic (e.g. bottle tops)
  • fishing line
  • fishing gear (e.g. hooks, lures, reels)
  • anything that poses an entanglement risk (e.g. hair ties, rope, nets, rubber bands, items with strings or loops, packing tape)
  • balloons

[NB - this isn't an extensive list and it this will depend on your locale and native wildlife, but it does give you a good starting point if you do need to do collection triage.]

Some nice to haves

Things that are nice to have, but not as pressing to collect:

  • straws
  • cardboard objects (cigarette boxes, food packets)
  • drink bottles
  • cans
  • food/takeaway containers

 

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