From Sydney to Tokyo

“Your storage space will be in a box next to your bunk, dimensions – 50cm x 40cm x 26cm”

Really? Wow. Trying to minimize my pack list for the month at sea has been a challange. If I wasn’t committed to documenting the voyage I think I could meet the space limitation, though the x220, cameras an audiod recording gear take up more space than my personal supplies!

Tokyo is great, very interesting from a plastic pollution perspective. Vending machines are everywhere! They even dispense beer. What surprised me is every vending machine has it’s own recycling bin. Is this a legal requirement?

This  has an obvious impact on reducing the beverage container pollution in urban areas, though we know Japan has a beverage container pollution problem on the coast.. So where is the local contribution  coming from? I have some ideas on that.. will follow up after some more detective work.

Joining the 5 Gyres/Algalita Marine Research Foundation 2012 Japanese Tsunami Debris Expedition has meant acquiring some new gear, my 4 year old laptop just couldn’t cope anymore. Goodbye trusty friend. The learning curve in new software and gear is a small challenge, have to get up to speed before we sail. Thanks to Lenovo and Adobe for supporting Two Hands Project with gear and imaging software.

While in Tokyo we are staying in “Fight House” a previously abandoned building which housed survivors after the 2011 tsunami, it is now used to house kids visiting Tokyo from the country for sporting events.

Meeting the team has been a blast, we have a diverse crew from as far afield as Switzerland and Brazil! I’ll introduce them in upcoming entries.

Our Japanese hosts have been wonderful, and hosted a party for the expedition team, great food and an abundance of beer.

One of the highlights so far was attending the Symposium on plastic pollution at Tokyo university. Great presentations all round, the science being conducted in Japan on this issue is impressive, and somewhat surprising given the heavy use of plastic packaging here!

Captain Charles Moore of Algalita Marine Research Foundation joined us in Tokyo to present at the symposium. It was great to meet the man who is credited to alerting the world on the existence massive plastic pollution in  the North Pacific Gyre.

Gotta run, Fukushima Prefecture is next.

Paul

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