Tsunami debris& Boobies AHOY!

DAY 11 – Tuesday 20th June 2012   30° 30.5′ N 167° 26.6′ E

The dawn watch is the best, particularly when sailing east, I am fast falling in love with the open ocean. I greet the sun standing in the bows, with a pool net in hand, scooping plastic from the sea.  The ocean looks like a giant swimming pool, clear depths and gentle swell….

A pair of Boobies (birds that is) were flying about Sea Dragon, dropping to pluck flying fish out of the air as our bow wave startled the fish into leaping from the water. Such an amazing behaviour to observe, a bird catching fish on the wing!

Boobies indicate land is near, they don’t range as far as some birds, on checking the charts we saw we are around 600 Nautical Miles north of Wake Is. where they are known to nest.

We are now in the south eastern part of the tsunami debris field and are spotting objects regularly. The tsunami debris we find here will be floating on or just below the waterline, providing little windage to be blown east, indeed that is reflected in what we are finding. Buckets, shoes, bottles, toys and so forth.

Two items we have recovered that are almost certainly tsunami debris is some traditional Japanese floor matting and a light truck tyre of the sort used in Japan. The rate of degradation and colonisation by marine life puts both of these objects as entering the ocean in the correct time period. We still hope to find some traceable debris.

I spotted a rare glass float, it appears to be a recent one, and we bought it on board. Marcus said some fish farms in Korea are still using them. Glass is a much better material than plastic in this application, is inert when in the environment and does not carry toxins or pollute.. Bring back glass floats! These floats are beautiful, I have dreamed of finding one for years.. I offered to fight Marcus for possession of the float, though lucky for me he refused (the guy is an ex Marine, my only hope of winning would be to shout “look, tsunami debris!!” then hit him from behind  :-D )

Typhoon Guchol is moving fast up the Japanese coast, bringing flood & strong winds. Though it is unlikely to hit us directly it is a huge storm, comparable to Hurricane Katrina that devastated New Orleans…. Rodrigo our skipper is unsure of what it will mean to us, though 30ft plus swells and high winds aren’t out of the question. Our storm sails have been checked and are on deck in readiness.With luck that is how they will stay.

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