Years to come

DAY 15 – Tuesday 26th June 2012   29° 17′ N 178° 20′ E

We’ve been sailing for  over two weeks now, the Sea Dragon is a beautiful vessel, it’s incredible to be at the helm or on bow lookout as she moves through the swells. Weather has been a bit wearing, squalls regularly soaking us with rain and seas coming on board covering us in saltwater. Below decks is pretty disgusting, wet and smelly, we need some sunshine and dry weather soon.

I’d like to thank everyone who helped Two Hands Project send me on this expedition, I feel immense gratitude to you all, without your support I wouldn’t be here. I am learning so much out here.

Do you have any questions you’d like to ask? About the voyage,  tsunami debris, plastic pollution or life on board Sea Dragon? If so fire away, our shore support will relay the questions and I will endeavour to answer them next post.

Today we’ve been joined by a Wandering Albatross, a privilege indeed, these incredible birds spend the majority of their lives on the wing, effortlessly gliding for thousands of miles. They actually lock their wings in flight position so as not to expend muscle energy holding them in place.

Our other avian companions are a quartet of Tropic Birds, white bodied with black beaks and trailing tail plumes as long again as their bodies. These guys are so perfectly set up for life in the air their legs are practically useless, when they make landfall for breeding they’ll crash land and drag themselves about on the ground.

We’re still spotting tsunami debris, our most significant find has been the bow of a Japanese fishing boat, with ID markings intact. We hope the owner will be found alive and safe in Japan. Having visited devastated fishing villages in Japan finds like this are sobering.

Finding tsunami debris this far south west is important, as it demonstrates the debris field is incredibly widespread. We’ll be seeing flotsam from the tsunami reaching the US mainland for many years to come.

Perhaps the most surprising thing to me, is that in two weeks of sampling and observing we have only found one piece of natural driftwood. Compared with the abundance of synthetic flotsam this simply blows my mind.

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